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Center for Health Journalism Member Blog

The Center for Health Journalism invites journalists, policy thinkers and medical professionals to share their perspectives with our diverse and interdisciplinary community. Our member blog captures a range of perspectives on health, health policy and health journalism. Interested in blogging? Reach out to [email protected].

Picture of Sara Shakir

The number of parks, fresh food stores, bicycle and jogging paths are influencing the spread of obesity and diabetes, particularly in minority communities, according to popular and scientific literature. I am reviewing the academic work been developed in several important cities that are trying to map out obesity and to correlated its prevalence with environmental factors. Recommendations and innovative solutions to the obesity epidemic in low income communities will be of particular interest.

Related work (comming soon!)

Picture of Shuka Kalantari

As Congress considers a major overhaul of the U.S. health care system, Health Dialogues examines how the new state budget will affect health care closer to home. Will kids in low income families be able to get basic services? What about drug treatment programs mandated by Proposition 36? And how may where you live affect the care you'll get?

Healthy Families Long-Term Stability in Question: Find out what it's like to be a 15 year-old girl without health insurance, as Health Dialogues hears from one of nearly 80,000 children on the Healthy Families waiting list backlog.

Picture of Andy Hall

Here's a quick description of my fellowship project:

The working title is "Unequal care: An investigation of health-care disparities in Wisconsin." By many measures, Wisconsin residents enjoy some of the best health care in America. The state was ranked ninth in the Commonwealth Fund's 2007 State Scorecard on Health System Performance, which "assesses state variation across key dimensions of health system performance: access, quality, avoidable hospital use and costs, equity, and healthy lives."

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

Reading some books is like feeling a cool breeze wash over you on a sun-dappled beach as waves gently lap nearby.

The whole effect is soothing, restorative, healing.

But then there are other books which grab you with an urgency the way your mother’s voice called you by your full name when you were in trouble.

Picture of Celeste Fremon

Although gangs and gang violence have been reconceived in recent years as a public health problem requiring systemic cures---there is far less agreement on what those cures might be. While transforming the community conditions that produce gang violence is the purported goal for policy makers in Los Angeles, there is little consensus about what strategy or group of strategies are best suited to achieve this goal.

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

Hi all,

Here is a basic outline of my project that I’d like to share with you guys. The project is consisted of three separated stories about health issues in the Asian Community.

1. Domestic violence against seniors in the Chinese Community.

Picture of Elizabeth Hsing-Huei Chou

I wanted to share a story I wrote about a local author who published a memoir on her struggles with bipolar disorder. I about her book, "Bipolar Girl: My Psychotic Self," which is a frank and detailed account of what it was like growing up in a traditional Mexican-American family that did not possess a "manual" for how to handle her illness, and her own struggle to accept her illness.

Picture of Manny Hernandez

It’s been five years since I started navigating the waters of social
media. I was trying to get a feel for what others were seeing in
MySpace, so I joined it and I soon joined Facebook too. Flickr,
YouTube, LinkedIn, Twitter and other sites were part of the plethora of
social media destinations I visited periodically. They all had one
thing in common: they allowed me to socialize and share with others
online.

Picture of Dennis McHale

Howard I read your article "MSM fact-checking of Sarah Palin." Let's be honest about this entire exercise of 'Examining' Sarah Palin, and that is what many in the MSM are attempting to do here. If Sarah Palin had written the words "Complete Lives System" on her Facebook page in place of the "Death Panels", Sarah Palin would not be part of the healthcare debate. If the MSM didn't think they had a "GOTCHA" story on her they would not have acted, to my knowledge, in a unprecedented manner reaching out to a Facebook page to make National News.

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