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Air Quality

Picture of Monica Vaughan
Sand dunes at a state recreation area popular with off-road vehicles on California's Central Coast is sending tiny dust particles miles inland, creating an ongoing crisis in air quality.
Picture of Chinyere Amobi
We recently spoke with Brenda Woods-Placky, director of the Climate Matters program at Climate Central, to discuss how journalists can best report on the science and health impact of climate change.
Picture of Marissa Ortega-Welch
Not everyone is happy about California's new climate change laws. Local environmental justice groups say the policies do not go far enough to address the issue and believe they actually might hurt local communities.
Picture of Marissa Ortega-Welch
The Bay Area air district is currently weighing a proposed cap on greenhouse gases and pollutants coming from the five Bay Area refineries. The cap would in effect freeze local refineries at their current levels of production.
Picture of Monica Velez
In California’s Merced County, residents are more likely to be exposed to tobacco, suffer from poor air quality, or die of heart disease. At the same time, the region faces a long-running shortage of doctors.
Picture of Jamie Hopkins

Air pollution is a real health risk for people in communities across the U.S., as extensive research shows. But while we all have to breathe, not everyone breathes the same air, thanks to big variations from place to place.

Picture of Angela Hart

In California's Sonoma County, some families face living conditions that include high levels of dangerous mold and other asthma triggers. When landlords don't act, problems can fester for years, leading to a host of health problems.

Picture of Ryan White

A new study of kids in the Los Angeles basin found that as air quality “improved dramatically” in recent years, so did the capacity of children's lungs. The study's attributes the gains to more stringent emissions standards. But can the air quality gains continue amid a resurgent economy?

Picture of Cara DeGette

While covering the polluted mess left behind from where Colorado’s celebrated gold and silver booms were processed for more than 100 years, Cara DeGette literally followed her nose to report on a potential health risk no one initially wanted to discuss.

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

When I left for a week of reporting in rural California in late February, I didn't know I would come back with two stories about the devastating health consequences of isolation.

I'm not just talking about the geographic isolation one finds in a remote area. From the hilly evergreen landscape of eastern Shasta County, to the agricultural flatlands of Tulare County in the South Central Valley, I witnessed how isolation can leave people in the dark about keeping healthy, lead to emotional despair, and pose real barriers to quality of life.

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