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Alameda

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Alameda County saw a dramatic dip in its black infant mortality rate in the late 2000s. What can we learn from the county's success — and what went wrong since then?
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What does it take to keep students from low-income and troubled home lives out of the school to prison pipeline? Caring adults and mentors who believed in them as well as a safe and secure environment are key.

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Some non-profit hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area receive millions of dollars in tax breaks each year to care for the poor and uninsured, yet they provide only a fraction of local charity care. Sandy Kleffman reports.

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Gamblers are at a higher risk of suicide, stress-related illnesses, divorce, bankruptcy, arrests and incarceration. Those seeking help for their addiction usually do so when close to or in the midst of crisis. In many cases, the call for help initially doesn’t come from the gambling addict, but from a concerned or aggravated family member. For years, immigrant or refugee Asians living in California have found the search for assistance is difficult. Many treatment providers didn’t understand the cultural nuances or risk factors, much less speak the language needed by the gambling addict or their family.

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On Sunday, a four-part series a year in the making runs in the Bay Area News Group. As the science reporter for the chain, I teamed with health reporter Sandy Kleffman to report and write this series.

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A Contra Costa Times investigation finds that East Bay hospitals benefited from at least $81 million in tax breaks in 2005, while providing less than $43 million in charity care.

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Catholic Charities of the East Bay is a diverse, multi-service nonprofit agency. Since 1935, it has provided social services and advocacy to people in need in Alameda and Contra Costa counties regardless of their religious affiliation. The organization seeks to expand health and social services, especially for Southeast Asians and Vietnamese seniors.

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Lillian Galedo is executive director of Filipinos for Affirmative Action, an organization working to advance social and economic justice and realize democratic and human rights for Filipinos in the East Bay. FAA serves the more than 120,000 Filipinos in the East Bay, focusing on Union City in southern Alameda County, Oakland and Alameda in northern Alameda County, and San Pablo, Hercules and Pinole in west Contra Costa County. FAA focuses its work on the most vulnerable populations, including low- to moderate-income immigrants, newcomers and youth.

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