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basic services

Picture of Ryan White

Living for decades on boats, Sausalito's anchor-outs face daily perils, ongoing health challenges and stepped-up police scrutiny.

Picture of Bernice Yeung

Although California is the world’s 9th largest economy and a hub of tech innovation, some of the state’s residents live in communities that lack basic services ­like clean water and functioning sewage systems.

Picture of Bernice Yeung

Nearly every day, Arleen Hernandez battles an aging septic tank that backs up into her toilet and shower. Upon moving to Parklawn in 1986, she didn’t realize her new neighborhood lacks basic public services.

Picture of Emily Ramshaw

Nearly half a million Texans live in substandard conditions in colonias -- 2,300 unincorporated and isolated border towns with limited access to potable water, sewer systems, electricity, sanitary housing or health care. Emily Ramshaw reports on their health conditions.

 

Picture of Angilee Shah

The National Health Journalism Fellows will take a tour of the varied landscapes of Downtown Los Angeles this afternoon. Their guides, Sandra McNeill, Executive Director of the Figueroa Corridor Community Land Trust, and Roberto Bustillo, a tenant organizer for Strategic Actions for a Just Economy (SAJE), say that the much lauded revitalization projects are exacerbating problems faced by long-time tenants in the area.

Picture of Shuka Kalantari

As Congress considers a major overhaul of the U.S. health care system, Health Dialogues examines how the new state budget will affect health care closer to home. Will kids in low income families be able to get basic services? What about drug treatment programs mandated by Proposition 36? And how may where you live affect the care you'll get?

Healthy Families Long-Term Stability in Question: Find out what it's like to be a 15 year-old girl without health insurance, as Health Dialogues hears from one of nearly 80,000 children on the Healthy Families waiting list backlog.

Announcements

If you're a journalist with big ideas who wants your work to matter, the Center for Health Journalism invites you to apply for the all-expenses-paid-- five days of stimulating discussions in Los Angeles about social and health safety net issues, reporting and engagement grants of $2,000-$12,000 and six months of expert mentoring.

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