Skip to main content.
Menu

chemical

Picture of Erica Peterson

Across the country, power plants spew mercury into the air, but it’s hard to make the case for stricter pollution limits without referencing the devastating effects heavy metals have on human health.

Picture of Joy Horowitz

Recent studies have found statistical links between pesticide use and an outbreak of Parkinson's disease in California farm towns. Researchers even know which chemicals are the likely culprits. What's the government doing about it? Not much.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Clean cars could mean less asthma, a link between bedbugs and MRSA, a prescription for yoga and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why do so many Americans think health reform has been repealed? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

For the past year and a half, Julie Sullivan at the Oregonian, one of the country’s most consistent and skilled investigative reporters, has been writing about troops that were exposed to the cancer-causing chemical hexavalent chromium in Iraq.

Picture of Dan Lee

Each year, about 60,000 Americans receive a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, a devastating neurological condition that can destroy motor skills and the ability to speak. Patients with the disease, also called Parkinson disease or PD, may display tremors, difficulty walking, dementia, hallucinations, stiffened limbs and slurred speech. The cause: nerve cells that have stopped producing dopamine, a chemical that coordinates the body's muscle function. Most people who are diagnosed with the disease are over 65, but 15 percent are under 50. Celebrity patients, such as actor Michael J.

Picture of Eduardo A. de Oliveira

Chemical remains pose health hazards to fish, migrant fishermenFor decades the Nyanza Color & Chemical plant manufactured dye and textile chemicals in Ashland, Massachusetts. The site was settled in a populated area and was first identified as a hazard in 1971, when pollution was found in the nearby Sudbury River, once considered as a potential source of drinking water for the Boston area. In 1982 the site was put on the Superfund National Priority List and shut down. Over 45,000 tons of chemical sludge had been generated by the waste water treatment processes.

Picture of William Heisel

Andrew Schneider is one of the country's most accomplished investigative journalists. His work has won not just , but Pulitzer Prizes, and countless other awards. I had the privilege of meeting him when both of us were finalists for the for Investigative Reporting at Harvard. My team lost. So did his.

Announcements

The deadline is Friday, December 14, to apply for the 2019 California Fellowship, which provides $1,000 reporting grants and six months of expert mentoring to 20 journalists, community engagement grants of up to $2,000, specialized mentoring, to five.  

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

купить дипломную работу в Туле

www.steroid.in.ua/products/andropen-275

генератор водорода цена