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Chronic stress

Picture of Priska Neely
KPCC’s Priska Neely reports on one of the reasons it has been so hard to bring down the black infant mortality rate: systemic racism is at the heart of the issue.
Picture of Priska Neely
This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. Other stories in the series include:   Black babies die at twice the rate of white babies. My family is part of this statistic   America's black babies are pay
Picture of Priska Neely
It's one thing to identify the complex social cause of this crisis. It's far harder to combat racism and stop more babies from dying.
Picture of Priska Neely
This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being....
Picture of Priska Neely
I remember the first time I heard about black infant mortality disparities. I was at a conference last summer on perinatal health and there was one presentation focused on the topic. The chilling statistic was uttered over and over again: black infants in the United States are twice as likely to die
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
Boston-based nonprofit EMPath combines personal mentoring with brain science to equip low-income families with tools to deal with the economic and social stress that comes with poverty.
Picture of Daisy Rosario

There has been growing recognition in recent years that "toxic stress" can disfigure young lives in lasting ways. But how do health systems begin to address the problem? Daisy Rosario looks at how the Montefiore health system in the Bronx is tackling the issue through pediatric care.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Children who experience abuse or neglect–or even the stress of poverty—can have serious health problems later in life. That’s one of many challenges for children in Rhode Island’s child welfare system.

Picture of Nancy  Cambria

Every day as I drive to my office at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, I pass homes with yard signs stating “Black Lives Matter and “I heart Ferguson,” but also, “We must stop killing each other,” a nod to the constant human stress, trauma and, ultimately, shortened life expectancy in these communities.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

"Astounding" domestic violence stats, a South Carolina health reform scandal, and post-Katrina heart attacks, more in our Daily Briefing.

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