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Picture of Tonya Pavlenko
Even with help from food stamps and a federal nutrition program, nearly half of U.S. households receiving such benefits struggle to feed their families.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
When juvenile detention worker Uriah T. Harris heard the boys in his charge using profane language, he calmly offered a choice: they could be struck with a broom handle or receive demerits that could lengthen their stay. Many boys were hit with the broom.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The juvenile justice employees who enforce rules, dole out discipline, offer guidance, and help decide how long teenagers must remain locked up are the foundation of the youth correctional system. Some have criminal records little better than the youths they supervise.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The allegations were straight out of Oliver Twist: Teens said there were maggots in the food — and barely enough of it. Officers choked and punched them. For discipline and diversion, workers organized fights among the detainees.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
Spurred by the death of 17-year-old Elord Revolte after a fight in a Miami-Dade County juvenile lockup, the Miami Herald undertook an exhaustive investigation into the state’s deeply troubled juvenile justice system.
Picture of Tiffany Lankes
Many of Buffalo’s children spend years battling the consequences of violence and PTSD. School is often the best hope to support them, but the Buffalo district has been slow to act.
Picture of Ed Williams
If there’s any police department that understands what an opioid epidemic means for a community, it’s New Mexico's Española Police Department. Even the chief of police has had addiction struggles within his own family.
Picture of Mallory  Falk
In New Orleans, children screen positive for post-traumatic stress disorder at three times the national average. WWNO’s Mallory Falk and Eve Troeh explore how the city’s education reforms after Katrina have made it harder for some students to recover from trauma, and to learn.
Picture of Samantha Caiola

"Finding families touched by the death of a child was hard," writes Sammy Caiola of the Sacramento Bee. "And convincing them to talk to me was even harder."

Picture of Tiffany Lankes

A recent survey of students in Buffalo revealed that roughly one in three had seen someone shot, stabbed or assaulted in their neighborhood. The crisis is all the more harrowing given what we're learning about childhood trauma's life-long effects on health and well-being.

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