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disparities

Picture of Katharine Gammon
Children living in low-opportunity neighborhoods were four times more likely to visit acute care in a year compared with those in the highest-opportunity hoods, a recent study found.
Picture of John Gonzales
Alameda County saw a dramatic dip in its black infant mortality rate in the late 2000s. What can we learn from the county's success — and what went wrong since then?
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
"My neighborhood has too many candlelight vigils for victims of police brutality or from neglect or incompetence from law enforcement who were not around enough to prevent the situations in the first place."
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
As part of The Plain Dealer's "Dear Cleveland" series, the newspaper is bringing young voices to the forefront of the community conversation.
Picture of Jonathan Kahn
If racism is reduced to a biological bug, who needs a March on Washington to promote racial justice when you have the right pill for the job?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“This is just such a powerful but elegantly simple intervention,” said the lead researcher behind a recent study that used parent mentors to enroll families in Medicaid and CHIP coverage.
Picture of Priska Neely
I remember the first time I heard about black infant mortality disparities. I was at a conference last summer on perinatal health and there was one presentation focused on the topic. The chilling statistic was uttered over and over again: black infants in the United States are twice as likely to die
Picture of Francisco Castro
Susana Castro’s arms are deformed, bruised and mangled. At 67-year-old native of Mexico City has suffered from diabetes since she was 40. She now requires three hours of dialysis treatment every third day, or else she will die.
Picture of Alejandra Molina
Black infants in California and across the nation are dying at higher rates than infants of other races. Communities are responding to the disparity in different ways, with some forming groups to train more doulas of color.
Picture of Emily Underwood
Poor people, people in isolated, rural areas and minorities are least likely to receive palliative care and counseling about end-of-life decisions. And one-third of U.S. hospitals don’t have a palliative care team.

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