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journalism ethics

Picture of Christopher Meyers
Journalists should strive for absolute clarity in language choice. Avoid ambigious phrases such as, “Dead but on life support.”
Picture of Susan  Abram
“When you're dealing with people who are not used to dealing with the media, we have a responsibility to protect them from themselves,” the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's James Causey said.
Picture of Arielle Levin Becker

When reporter Arielle Levin Becker set out to interview families involved in a home-visiting program, she found unexpectedly difficult. The reservations voiced by potential sources ultimately led her to rethink how she approaches interviews in general.

Picture of Emily DePrang

Smart reporting on mental health makes an effort to avoid stigmatizing people with mental illness. Here are a few solutions one reporter found especially helpful in covering the subject in Texas, where the state's largest jail became its largest mental health facility.

Picture of Gary Schwitzer

If anything, the FCC proposal may not go far enough.

Picture of William Heisel

When is a story important enough to warrant reporting on a cause of death? Do the deaths of famous people open an opportunity to raise public awareness about medical errors or other health threats? What about the person next door?

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