Skip to main content.
Menu

lead poisoning

Picture of Barbara Laker
Many Philadelphia schools are incubators for illness, with environmental hazards that endanger students and hinder learning.
Picture of Joe Rubin
Except for one fleeting moment in 1996, the agencies in charge have operated in virtual silos, failing to coordinate actions or share incontrovertible evidence that the facility was a potential death trap for workers.
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Dear Cleveland: To learn, you first have to listen
Picture of Joe Rubin
Are California regulators in denial about the dangers of lead? The state's response to previous lead-poisoning crises raise plenty of doubts.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
While many policymakers still think of concentrated poverty as an issue afflicting the nation’s big urban centers, smaller cities are increasingly home to those Americans with the greatest needs and the least resources. Take East St. Louis, for example.
Picture of Erin Schumaker
“Everyone agrees that housing is an important determinant of health, but that’s very hard to measure because it’s overly correlated with other aspects of poverty,” said Thomas Waters, a housing policy analyst in New York City.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
For an ambitious project on lead in Chicago, City Bureau started with the question: "How do we as journalists meet people where they are?" The answer included a text-message service that responds with lead test data for the user's community.
Picture of Ryan White
New research on lead's negative effects on IQ and class makes a brutal irony even clearer — lead is a lifelong disaster, particularly for poor children already facing serious disadvantages.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
Data recently made public by Philadelphia's school district showed that nearly 15 percent of water samples taken from school drinking water outlets had lead higher than the legal level for home tap water. This needs to change.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
In the wake of reporting from two National Fellows, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said Monday that the city will begin to enforce a four-year-old law that requires landlords to certify that their properties are lead-safe before renting to families with young kids.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Member Activities

Roch Vachon commented on a post

Join the conversation.

Anna Romano has shared a blog post

Read it.

Jill Replogle has shared a fellowship project

Read it.

Judith Mernit joined the community

Connect with Judith Mernit

Jennifer Takhar joined the community

Connect with Jennifer Takhar
More Member Activities