Skip to main content.
Menu

lead poisoning

Picture of Emmanuel Felton
In East St. Louis, the school district is helping parents get back on their feet.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Locals are the first to acknowledge that pouring more money into the city isn’t the only answer.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
A month after an investigation found dangerous levels of asbestos fibers in some of Philadelphia’s most rundown elementary schools, the school district has begun cleaning up seven of them.
Picture of Joe Rubin
Why would Disneyland be part of an effort to defeat a bill that requires reporting of blood-lead levels high enough to produce heart disease and serious brain disorders?
Picture of Barbara Laker
Many Philadelphia schools are incubators for illness, with environmental hazards that endanger students and hinder learning.
Picture of Joe Rubin
Except for one fleeting moment in 1996, the agencies in charge have operated in virtual silos, failing to coordinate actions or share incontrovertible evidence that the facility was a potential death trap for workers.
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Dear Cleveland: To learn, you first have to listen
Picture of Joe Rubin
Are California regulators in denial about the dangers of lead? The state's response to previous lead-poisoning crises raise plenty of doubts.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
While many policymakers still think of concentrated poverty as an issue afflicting the nation’s big urban centers, smaller cities are increasingly home to those Americans with the greatest needs and the least resources. Take East St. Louis, for example.
Picture of Erin Schumaker
“Everyone agrees that housing is an important determinant of health, but that’s very hard to measure because it’s overly correlated with other aspects of poverty,” said Thomas Waters, a housing policy analyst in New York City.

Pages

Announcements

There's a growing push by Republican governors to require Medicaid recipients to work to receive care. And the Trump administration is giving them the green light. This webinar will explore what this policy shift means for Medicaid enrollees, and outline questions reporters should be asking now. Sign up here!

Want to improve your data journalism skills?  Apply now for the $2,000 California Data Fellowship -- four all-expenses-paid days of training on data acquisition, analysis and visualization, a $2,000 reporting grant and six months of expert mentoring.  Dates:  October 17-20. Deadline: August 27.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Member Activities

Priska Neely has shared a fellowship project

Read it.

Karen Sundstrom joined the community

Connect with Karen Sundstrom

Jeff Rideout joined the community

Connect with Jeff Rideout

Natalie Slopen's profile has been updated

Connect with Natalie Slopen

Anna Romano has shared a blog post

Read it.
More Member Activities
женский возбудитель в каплях цена

続きを読みます hebidoshi84.blog.fc2.com

таблетки повышающие потенцию