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Across Louisville, more than 44,000 people live within food deserts, meaning they can't easily get healthy, affordable food. Here are some key takeaways from The Courier Journal's coverage of the issue.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Louisville neighborhoods without grocery stores have higher risks of developing illnesses. And it's costing us millions in emergency health care.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Residents of Shelby Park have long bemoaned their lack of options for healthy and affordable food, and those who shopped at the Save-A-Lot will likely have to travel a mile farther.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal has received support from the University of Southern California's Center for Health Journalism to embark on a project about food insecurity in Louisville, with the goal of presenting solutions that fit our community.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Over the past decade, study after study has shown that thousands of people who live within certain areas of Louisville don't have adequate access to food.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
A reporter sets out to make the issue of food insecurity hit home — both for the average reader and Louisville's leaders.
Picture of Erica Peterson

To document Rubbertown, Ky., residents’ claims of unusually high rates of disease, I needed hard data. Originally, I had planned a health survey of the areas around the industrial plants. When that proved impractical, I enlisted a state health monitoring agency.

Picture of Erica Peterson

My series about Rubbertown, Ky., included real people who have lived close by their whole lives and were exposed to all kinds of chemicals in the past. But I would have sensationalized the story if I hadn’t reported the uncertainty that still permeates most of the research on health in the area.

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What’s the answer for dealing with past, present and potential safety problems in Rubbertown? Kick out the industry? Move the people? Find some middle ground where everyone can coexist? Is it even possible to coexist?

Picture of Erica Peterson

Start your car. See that puff from the tailpipe in your rear-view mirror? Benzene, butadiene, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide. Louisville communities burdened by pollution on the West End also face emissions from local traffic.

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If you're a journalist with big ideas who wants your work to matter, the Center for Health Journalism invites you to apply for the all-expenses-paid-- five days of stimulating discussions in Los Angeles about social and health safety net issues, reporting and engagement grants of $2,000-$12,000 and six months of expert mentoring.

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