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Journalists are playing a key role in highlighting outrageous health care price tags. Why this flood of stories now? And will they make a difference?
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Just before President Obama announced a new set of new initiatives to boost access to addiction treatment this week, a four-part series on NPR looked at the opioid epidemic's smallest victims, and what can be done to improve their care.

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Peggy Girshman, a visionary journalist beloved by many and a longtime friend of our center, died Monday. She was a gifted leader, generous mentor, and a funny, endearing presence to those lucky enough to work with her.

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For my fellowship project, I aimed to compare two other states to my home state of Colorado’s approach to the Affordable Care Act. Showing the law actually creating new opportunities in Colorado would be easy. Showing the law not working in a state that's resisting it would be tougher.

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Reporter Erika Beras discusses her series on the health of refugees and the linguistic, cultural and logistical barriers to health.

Picture of Ruxandra Guidi

Reporter Erika Beras discusses her series on the health of refugees and the linguistic, cultural and logistical barriers to health.

Picture of Ryan White

Figuring out how to couch health policy stories in broader narratives can be a challenge, but trotting out different storytelling approaches becomes increasingly important when it comes to policy topics such as Obamacare that are in the news every day.

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Regulations fail to protect miners' health, the Cambodian disease identified, a vote on Obamacare and more from our Daily Briefing.

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A commutation of sentence for grandmother Shirley Ree Smith has brought the medical debate around shaken baby syndrome back into the news.

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Mental health patients often don't get the physical health care they need. Journalist Martha Bebinger examines efforts to find these patients a new "medical home."

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