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Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The challenge for journalists covering the country’s unchanged perinatal mortality rate is to go beyond the hospital setting, says Boston University's Eugene Declercq.
Picture of Tonya Pavlenko
Even with help from food stamps and a federal nutrition program, nearly half of U.S. households receiving such benefits struggle to feed their families.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
Diapering a child now takes about $1,000 a year on average. For families on the cusp of poverty, it’s a serious burden that can have lasting consequences on both children and parents.
Picture of Priska Neely
I remember the first time I heard about black infant mortality disparities. I was at a conference last summer on perinatal health and there was one presentation focused on the topic. The chilling statistic was uttered over and over again: black infants in the United States are twice as likely to die
Picture of Alejandra Molina
Black infants in California and across the nation are dying at higher rates than infants of other races. Communities are responding to the disparity in different ways, with some forming groups to train more doulas of color.
Picture of Chinyere Amobi
When Jessica Porten sought help for postpartum depression, she wasn't expecting the nurse to call the police to escort her to the ER. She now believes moms need far better help for their mental health needs.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Out of 160 Fresno Unified high school students who took a survey conducted by The Fresno Bee, more than half said they had only “learned a little” about sex in school. Sixteen percent said they had learned nothing at all.
Picture of Rebecca  Adams
Minnesota officials knew they would exhaust Children’s Health Insurance Program money by the end of this year and likely be out of money for coverage of low-income children and pregnant women by the end of September. And Congress will probably not meet a deadline to help.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
Christin Farmer knew she wanted to help women have babies at 16, when she watched an episode of TLC's "A Baby Story" and saw a midwife with a birthing center delivering babies.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
Birth attendants can positively affect outcomes for mothers and infants. But access to them is often out of reach for low-income and minority women, who have the highest rates of infant and maternal mortality.

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