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Parks can improve health and fight climate change. But not all parks affect a community the same way. Increasingly, activists and residents are asking the question, "Who's it for?"
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Both socioeconomic and public health cases can be made for dismantling the projects. People who live in Richmond, Va.'s, public housing for the duration of their lives are more likely to develop more illness and die younger than residents of other neighborhoods in the region.

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Richmond, Va.'s, communities differ vastly in the resources available for residents to pursue good health, and the result is a 12-year or more gap in average life expectancy in neighborhoods just miles apart.

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Richmond,Va., is an urban city of approximately 205,000 residents, of which about one in four live in poverty. The city has a poor showing on many health status indicators and outcomes. Within the city, however, there are neighborhoods of $1 million homes and moderate income neighborhoods.

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Cartoon reforms, refunds from insurance companies, partisan wrangling, putting the poor in the path of pollution and more from our Daily Briefing.

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This week, KQED is seeking citizen journalists in various cities to report on the health issues that plague their communities. Also, note that applications for the Health Journalism Fellowships presented by the Association of Health Care Journalists & Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are due in one week. As always, find the latest in health jobs, workshops and more.

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To a teen living in the rough areas of East Oakland, sorrow is no stranger. Random violence, worry about the future and a constant battle for basics such as healthy food or good schools add up to a kind of life that can make an East Oakland teen far older than his or her chronological age.

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, one of a handful of private companies that provide school lunches in the Bay Area, has helped Havens Elementary meet parent demand for nutritious and tasty foods produced in a sustainable manner. It has also helped with another of the parents’ goals: turning the lunch program into a profit center.  

 

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By Dan Lee

Antronette K. Yancey is a professor in the Department of Health Services, UCLA School of Public Health, and is Co‐Director of its Center to Eliminate Health Disparities. Dr.Yancey's primary research interests are in chronic disease prevention and adolescent health promotion. She returned to academia full‐time in 2001 after five years in public health practice, first as Director of Public Health for the city of Richmond, VA, and, until recently, as Director of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Dr.

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Catherine J. Ertz-Berger is executive director of the Contra Costa Child Care Council, a nonprofit organization offering a variety of child care programs and services to residents of Contra Costa County. Through area offices in Richmond, Concord and Antioch, and a satellite office in Brentwood, the council helps parents find the best child care placement for their child and family. To make referrals, the Child Care Council maintains information on more than 1,800 licensed caregivers.

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