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transparency

Picture of Martha Bebinger
The state is way ahead of the pack when it comes to publicly reporting the experiences of Medicaid patients.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Stories of absurd bills have been great for boosting awareness, but the next batch needs to take a harder look at the politics halting change, writes Trudy Lieberman.
Picture of Michelle Levander
Californians remain without a scorecard to track the performance of Medicaid provider groups, and state officials don't seem eager to change that.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Journalists are playing a key role in highlighting outrageous health care price tags. Why this flood of stories now? And will they make a difference?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The editor-in-chief of Health Affairs shares his thoughts on what a Trump presidency will mean for health care, and how reporters can cover this huge, evolving story.
Picture of William Heisel

An ocean view and a smoothie bar do not have any bearing on the quality of health care being delivered by doctors, nurses, and hospital staff. Wouldn’t it be nice if there were a simple way to compare hospitals?

Picture of Kathleen O'Brien

New Jersey’s governor, Chris Christie, has walked a fine line in his decisions about the Affordable Care Act: He accepted Washington’s offer to expand Medicaid, yet declined to set up a state exchange. (And even turned his back on a $7 million grant to help residents learn about their options on hea

Picture of William Heisel

How do you get access to death records? Leave your desk, for starters.

Picture of William Heisel

Why is the Vermont Department of Health hiding behind the HIPAA privacy law to keep secret the autopsy of a hiker who froze to death?

Picture of William Heisel

It’s crazy enough that some states make certain records public while other states ban them from public view. Even crazier: in some states, every county has a different set of rules. Here's how one journalist coped.

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