Skip to main content.
Menu

Fellowship Story Showcase

Explore our 1420 stories.

As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Journalist Yesenia Amaro examines how some small businesses will cope with health reform as their health costs for workers continue to soar.

Several national, statewide studies show similar results

Janna Rodriguez, one of the owners of J&R Tacos in Merced, wants to learn more about the specific provisions in the federal health care law designed to help small businesses such as hers. Her restaurant, which opened almost five years ago, employs eight part-time employees — and none of them receive health care benefits.

California's Central Valley has by far the highest agricultural production in the country. But those who work the land often don't benefit from the fresh fruits and vegetables they harvest.

When the Chicago City Council last week passed an ordinance to reduce emissions from construction equipment working on city jobs, it touched on a larger problem: harmful amounts of diesel exhaust in the city. Journalist Kari Lydersen found troubling emission levels in some neighborhoods.

 

The lack of support for breastfeeding in hospitals has a bigger effect on low-income mothers. It is common for hospitals to offer formula for newborn babies or separate them from their mothers at birth, without medical reason. Such practices are considered huge barriers to breastfeeding because they hinder the start.

Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

Tooth decay among kids is rampant

Del Norte County has a serious problem with tooth decay. In fact, the problem is spread across California — a recent study found that two-thirds of the state’s children have some form of tooth decay. Kelley Atherton finds out why.

Healthy Food for California Farm Workers

California’s Central Valley, also known as the greatest garden in the world, has by far the highest agricultural production in the country. But those who work in “the garden,” rarely benefit from the fresh fruits and vegetables they harvest.

One-third in Tulare County use Medi-Cal

Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a one-third of its population on Medi-Cal — California's version of Medicaid. This is more than any other county in the state, yet the resources to care for the Medi-Cal population are few.

Tulare County ranks 44th in doctor-to-population ratio

A look into why Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a severe lack of physicians.

Pages

Announcements

Our next webinar will explain the forces leading to the closure of rural hospitals and what the trend means for communities' health and well-being. Sign up here

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY