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Living in the Shadows - Blogs

A special series by the Reporting on Health Collaborative

About This Series

Many immigrants feel isolated in America – suffering that can turn toxic over time.

Six news outlets joined together as the Center for Health Journalism Collaborative to highlight the interplay between immigration status and health. The USC Annenberg project involves Mundo Hispánico (Atlanta), New America Media (California and New York), Radio Bilingüe (Fresno and Washington), WESA Pittsburgh, Univision Los Angeles and Univision Arizona.

The ACEs study had a huge impact on how the medical establishment thinks about childhood adversity and later-in-life health. Heart disease, depression, STDs — these and other conditions often have strong links to events experienced during childhood.

New York journalist Anthony Advincula discusses the challenge of finding a subject willing to speak openly on the sensitive issue.

Radio Bilingüe reporter discusses her story on the Fresno County health program that serves undocumented immigrants and faces an uncertain future.

Reporter Annabelle Sedano discusses her series on immigrant detention centers and the changes needed to the delivery of medical and mental health care for detainees.

Reporter Johanes Rosello discusses her series on family separation and the emotional and psychological suffering endured by children whose parents have been deported.

Reporter Erika Beras discusses her series on the health of refugees and the linguistic, cultural and logistical barriers to health.

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The Resilience of Refugee Children After War report put together by the American Psychological Association offers a a comprehensive assessment of decades of research into the psychological effects of the refugee experience.

Reporters who have covered immigrant communities may have heard of the “healthy migrant effect.” Here are some of the factors at play in this phenomenon.

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No matter their nationality, people leaving their countries as refugees often show signs of trauma, through PTSD, depression and other mental health problems. These findings provided one of the underpinnings for our Living in the Shadows series.

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Sifting through the scientific literature on immigration and health makes one thing clear above all else: the health of immigrants is very much shaped by the particulars of their background.

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Recent Stories

Thirty years ago, Fresno County was obligated to provide care to everyone who needed it, regardless of their immigration status. Now a judge has determined that the county no longer has to offer them medical services.

While children show different responses to early trauma, depending on factors such as their age, coping mechanisms, and family support, experts say that research shows that witnessing a parent's arrest or deportation leads to a complex series of problems.

Exhausted from the burden of her age and diabetes, Juana now pays more attention to the news. She recently learned of a California proposal to offer health insurance to people who are undocumented.

A Mexican-American woman decided to convert her house into a health insurance registration center. She invited her family and neighbors, most of them uninsured. Could this be a model strategy to sign up more Latinos?

All California counties have to offer a minimum of free or very low-cost health services to uninsured, low-income residents who do not qualify for subsidized health insurance and cannot pay for private insurance. But one county is trying to change this.

The consequences of separating parents from children can include causing or exacerbating mental health problems such as depressive or anxiety disorders.

In 2014, fellows Alonso Yáñez and Annabelle Sedano collaborated on a project highlighting shortcomings in detention facilities for undocumented immigrants operated by for-profit companies. As Obama reconsiders outsourcing detention centers, this project offers early warnings of problems to come.

Fatal errors and lack of adequate medical care in immigration detention centers bring suffering to detainees and their families.

As many as 1 in 4 of those detained have chronic medical conditions. Medical neglect can lead to deteriorated health and, in Fernando Dominguez Valdivia's case, death.

A Mexican father is released from detention thanks to a psychological evaluation used as evidence in court.

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