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Adverse Childhood Experiences

Picture of Debra Krol
A shortage of Native foster families has led to pain, lawsuits, and echoes of a painful history.
Picture of Harold Pierce
While scores of public agencies are working to develop resources and programs to address childhood trauma and toxic stress in their communities, San Joaquin County in California has been turning itself into a model for how to address the issue.
Picture of Harold Pierce
Stress is a powerful force. It can help us survive, but in some cases, lead to a lifetime of medical issues. A kid can only endure so many stressful traumatic experiences before it impacts his health.
Picture of Harold Pierce
So much of Luton’s childhood and adolescence seemed normal to her at the time. Her father mishandling her mother. Her brother coming after her with a metal poker. Her boyfriend with the meth addiction. All normal. It’s a wonder how she didn’t become a statistic herself.
Picture of ChrisAnna Mink
A young boy and his mother fled vicious gang violence in Central America, but the nightmares have followed him to Los Angeles. The lingering effects of trauma now pose a whole new threat to his health.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
A development biologist finds that the common zebrafish holds clues for how repeated exposure to stress can harm children's developing bodies and trigger a host of chronic health problems.
Picture of Harold Pierce
In some of Kern County’s poorest, majority-white communities, people are dying four to 17 years before those in other parts of Bakersfield, Calif. Life expectancies are on par with less-developed countries like Iraq and Kazakhstan.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
Stresses like poverty, neglect and abuse all manifest differently in the brain and can cause different mental health issues later in life, explains researcher Katie McLaughlin of the University of Washington.
Picture of Harold Pierce
An invisible disease has been killing middle-aged white people in the San Joaquin Valley at higher rates than ever before. One doctor calls them "deaths of despair."
Picture of Anna Challet
Childhood trauma and adversity have been big buzz phrases in recent years. But are they really just proxy terms for poverty? How one journalist came to rethink her own assumptions in reporting on mental health.

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