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at the crossroads

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Rhode Island’s prisons are grappling with a dilemma. Hundreds of inmates have hepatitis C. New drugs can cure it. But they’re so expensive the department of corrections can’t afford them for every inmate who’s sick.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

What’s the price of a human life? In this part of our series “At the Crossroads: The Rise of Hepatitis C and The Fight To Stop It,” we'll tell you what value health economists put on human life.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Revolutionary new treatments for hepatitis C have hit the market in just the last few months. But they are so expensive that health insurers are balking at the price. What do the drugs' exorbitant costs mean for patients, and who's paying for such treatments?

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

In just a few weeks, another pharmaceutical company will likely win FDA approval for a new drug to cure hepatitis C. It’s big news for those living with the chronic disease, many of whom have been waiting decades for a cure.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Hepatitis C infects an estimated 5 million Americans, although most of them don’t know it. But deaths from hepatitis C are on the rise in baby boomers. And throughout New England, new infections are creeping up among a younger generation.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

How do you stop an epidemic? Keep the people who are sick from infecting more people. Isolate them if you have to, treat them, and cure them. But what if you don’t know who’s sick? What if the person who’s still infectious doesn’t know it either, and won’t notice any symptoms for decades?

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The deadline is Friday, December 14, to apply for the 2019 California Fellowship, which provides $1,000 reporting grants and six months of expert mentoring to 20 journalists, community engagement grants of up to $2,000, specialized mentoring, to five.  

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