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drug use

Picture of Judith Mernit
"You can’t just waltz into a community of people who are marginalized and under threat, stick a microphone in their faces and start asking them questions," writes reporter Judith Mernit.
Picture of Teresa Sforza
Parents can feel hopeless when they enter the child welfare system. And things get complicated when California steps in to play parent.
Picture of Teresa Sforza
Over the decade from 2008 to 2017, as the opioid epidemic took hold, the number of drug-exposed infants born per year nearly tripled in California
Picture of Teresa Sforza
When the "crack baby epidemic" of the 1980s and '90s was raging, many experts offered stark, long-term forecasts. While those were overblown, there still is cause for concern. This series was produced with the support of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism Impact Fund.
Picture of Michell Eloy
“I just felt like my doctor didn’t hear me ... and I felt like she had blinders on,” one woman said.
Picture of Judith Mernit
Safe injection facilities represent the highest ideal of harm reduction services for people who inject drugs, yet in the United States remain almost prohibitively controversial.
Picture of Judith Mernit
The practice of harm reduction seeks not to shame people who use drugs into giving them up, but simply to provide them with the tools to improve their health.
Picture of Judith Mernit
Judith Lewis Mernit’s reporting on harm reduction in rural California was supported by the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2018 Impact Fund.
Picture of Linda Jacobson
As more states consider legalizing marijuana, California's First 5 agencies are on the forefront of educating the public about the impacts during pregnancy and in homes with young children.

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