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Hurricane Harvey

Picture of Marina Riker
In the months after Hurricane Harvey slammed the Texas Gulf Coast, residents of small towns and rural communities felt ignored and forgotten. Here's what I learned telling their stories.
Picture of Marina Riker
It wasn’t yet Christmas morning, but it may as well have been for Cindy Barrientes and her children. More than 10 people stood outside, bearing dozens of presents, new mattresses, household supplies and food for their family.
Picture of Marina Riker
Recovery in rural areas and small towns like Tivoli, Bayside and Austwell is vastly different from cities like Houston, where public and private funding flooded the city as quickly as Harvey’s rains did.
Picture of Marina Riker
How Waco is working together to improve families' education, finances and health.
Picture of Marina Riker
Little has been done to boost the number of affordable rental units since Harvey struck.
Picture of Marina Riker
In Victoria, Texas, families with limited budgets face harsh realities, with exploitative landlords and a shortage of safe, affordable rental housing. Then Hurricane Harvey made everything even worse.
Picture of Marina Riker
This article was produced as a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship.
Picture of Marina Riker
After learning about a Vietnam veteran who moved into his car after Hurricane Harvey, volunteers from the Texas Gulf Coast jumped in to help him clean up his home.
Picture of Marina Riker
He used to sleep in a bed. In a home. That was until Hurricane Harvey struck, when the 70-year-old lost his home and almost everything he owned.
Picture of Marina Riker
The problems that come with wealth inequality are long-entrenched in the Texas Gulf Coast, where people like Angelica Castaneda are struggling to rebuild.

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