Skip to main content.
Menu

SNAP

Picture of Tonya Pavlenko
Even with help from food stamps and a federal nutrition program, nearly half of U.S. households receiving such benefits struggle to feed their families.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona has the some of the strictest guidelines in the nation for welfare benefits. Tucson mother Jessala Grijalva can usually get what she needs for herself and her three children, but she’s found some surprising exceptions.
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
Trump's new budget wants to replace a portion of food stamp benefits with a box of "shelf-stable" items. For Native families who have endured such government-issued provisions in the past, that's a horrifying prospect.
Picture of Tracie Potts
Uncertainty about proposed budget and policy changes in Washington have put low-income and working families — and the programs and agencies that serve them — on high alert.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona tends to try out new approaches and programs, but rarely sticks with such efforts long enough to bring about change.
Picture of Lauren Weber
It's those first 1,000 days — from conception until a child's second birthday — that the brain most needs the right mix of nutrients to fully form. But programs that focus on such developmental goals are now at risk.
Picture of Ryan White

In the U.S., social welfare benefits tend to impose tight restrictions on recipients. But in Manitoba, low-income pregnant women can receive a no-strings-attached cash boost. Research suggests it leads to healthier babies.

Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton

Nationwide, one in seven families experience food insecurity at any given point in a year. The rates are higher in Indian Country, increasing the risks for the physical effects that come with poor nutrition.

Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton

“If you’re not able to provide food, it makes it difficult to feel like you’re living a dignified life,” researcher Darcy Freedman said. “It’s a basic need and the mental health implications are very real. ‘If I can’t provide food for my kids or partner, who am I?’”

Picture of Ryan White

When it comes to getting kids into health coverage, the numbers have never been better. By the first quarter of 2015, the percentage of kids without insurance was less than 5 percent. But despite the gains made in improving children’s coverage, big challenges remain on the horizon.

Pages

Announcements

In this webinar, two of the country’s leading health care policy reporters will give fellow reporters a behind-the-scenes look at how they track news developments, ferret out original stories and stay on top of their beat every day. Sign up here!

Want to improve your data journalism skills?  Apply now for the 2018 Data Fellowship -- four all-expenses-paid days of training on data acquisition, analysis and visualization, a $2,000-$4,000  reporting grant and six months of expert mentoring.  Dates:  October 17-20. Deadline: August 27 for California journalists, Sept. 7 for journalists from other states

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Member Activities

Judith Solomon has shared a blog post

Read it.

Sarah Smith commented on a post

Join the conversation.

Martha Rosenberg has shared a blog post

Read it.

Anna Romano has shared a blog post

Read it.

Kellie Schmitt has shared a blog post

Read it.
More Member Activities