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Karen Bouffard's blog posts

posted 08/06/2018
Community outreach has been particularly powerful in curbing dramatic disparities in organ donation between white and black Americans.
posted 05/03/2018
Critics fear a two-tier health system where the rich take priority over the rest. They argue concierge care will rob the system of needed physicians and hurt access to care for poorer patients.
posted 09/09/2015

Karen Bouffard and The Detroit News were awarded this week a 2015 Communication Award from the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine for Bouffard’s series “Surviving through age 18 in Detroit,” which she reported as a 2013 National Health Journalism Fellow.

posted 07/10/2013

In Michigan, companies have begun to recover, businesses are hiring and the economy is humming again. But recovery has remained elusive for many families whose struggles have been exacerbated by severe cuts to social safety nets, education and social programs.

Karen Bouffard's Blog

Community outreach has been particularly powerful in curbing dramatic disparities in organ... more »
posted 08/06/18
Critics fear a two-tier health system where the rich take priority over the rest. They argue... more »
posted 05/03/18
Karen Bouffard and The Detroit News were awarded this week a 2015 Communication Award from the... more »
posted 09/09/15

Karen Bouffard's Work

Detroit has the highest rate of asthma among young children in America’s 18 largest cities, a problem that experts link to urban ills that could affect their health and learning for the rest of their lives.

A Detroit News analysis of Michigan Department of Community Health data found an average of five children die annually of asthma in the city, including nine in 2006 and eight in 2007. But promising projects are underway to combat childhood asthma in Detroit, such as home visits by asthma educators.

Like many Detroit mothers, ChaunTia Murray is young, single and caring for a baby with significant health problems. But in a city with high infant mortality and maternal death rates, she is involved in a program that could vastly improve the chances for Murray and her baby.